Aloha Cancer 9/16/2015

moon waxingKū Kolu

Māhoe Mua 16

It has been a whirlwind the last few days. Haven’t been able to post, so I’m going to summarize here.

September 12th, 2015

On the heels of the 14th anniversary of 9/11 attacks and the 23rd anniversary of Hurricane Iniki, the torrential rains of yesterday cleared up, and I woke up to blue skies over Oah`u.

Headed out to Kailua to the Ulupo Heiau where I was meeting a hula teacher named Malia Helela. Ulupo actually means “grow out of darkness.” So all these images and weather patterns seemed to indicate a coming into the light from the dark.

Ulupo Heiau

I got to the sacred site early, so I walked around to check out the huge rock walls. At the bottom of the heiau I heard a movement in a Ti leaf plant next to me. Turns out a mo`o (gecko) was jumping from leaf to leaf. Then as I walked back to the meeting place, a large seed of a Pū Hala tree hit me right on the top of my head.

Later I learned that a mo`o goddess was known to frequent the heiau. Maybe she was hitting me on the piko (top of the head/crown chakra) to wake me up.

Malia showed up with 30+ volunteers to clean up the heiau. I joined her team that was put in charge of clearing the auwai (waterways) to the lo`i (taro patches). Malia emphasized that we are clearing not only the auwai, but also our own waterways in our bodies, minds, and spirits. This hit me deeply, since I am literally clearing a tumor out of my intestinal waterway.

Another powerful insight that Malia shared had to do with the ua (rain). She said that she had been taught never to run from the rain because it was a blessing. Working in the wet taro patches with sprinkling rain did feel like a blessing.

I was so happy to clear muddy waterways that I lost track of time. With a quick farewell, I jumped in the car and headed back to my Auntie’s house in Aiea. By the time I got back, I realized that I had just enough time to either eat or shower before the workshop.

I was starving, so I chose food. Driving to the workshop in my muddy jeans and tee-shirt, it dawned on me that this was a powerful practice of ha`aha`a (humility). What better way to stay humble than to “lead” a workshop in clothes dyed by the ‘āina (land).

workshop facilitator

At the workshop 15 curious participants showed up. My cousin came with her husband and son. She told her son that he could leave whenever he wanted because they brought two cars. He ended up staying the full 7 hours.

Another woman said she had to leave after a few hours, but ended up staying for six.

In one part of the workshop we ‘olu‘olued (comfort/be gentle with) each other by cradling our partner like a baby. After the exercise, one participant was amazed that her partner sang her favorite childhood song to her–“You are my Sunshine.” It turns out that these participants had never met before. Giovanni said he just felt like humming something, so he chose that song.

After 7 hours, we were all tired, but I felt connected with everyone there. It was a wonderful first Aloha Awakenings in Hawaii.

As I was packing up, my cousin drove her car up and gave me a big box. It was a water ionizer machine. She had bought me the deluxe machine that costs over 3000 dollars! I came to Hawai`i for the “Ha” (breath of the Divine), the “wai” (water), and “i” (spirit). Now I was leaving with a lifetime supply of healing wai.

I have been drinking the ionized 9.0 ph water everyday, and I feel so much better. Thank you for your love and generosity, Marie. You are my favorite cousin. :)

September 13, 2015

I woke up before dawn and drove out to see the sunrise on the Eastside of the island. It was beautiful, but also pouring rain, so I came back and crashed in front of the television.

sunrise kailua

On the public television was a show on cancer. They discussed powerful natural cures including olena (turmeric). At Ulupo, I met one of Malia’s students named Kaiolena (ocean turmeric). I took this as a sign to include turmeric in my healing.

At lunch, I went to the store to buy poi (pounded taro paste). While walking in, I made eye contact with a large Hawaiian man who looked a lot like my Hawaiian grandfather. He gave me a huge Hawaiian smile. I took this as a sign that my grandfather was happy with me.

In the afternoon, I met my friend Darren at Kaimana beach to go swimming. We talked about healing relationships with our fathers. I told Darren how I had talked with my stepfather and did some inner child healing work around my biological father. He talked about healing the relationship with his father and his grandfather. “I just wish my grandfather had told me that he loved me and was proud of me. Just one time,” Darren said.

Darren and his wife are expecting a son, so I shared that we can tell our sons how much we love them.

Giovanni from the workshop turned out to be a Reiki Master, so he showed up around sunset to give me a session. Giovanni is a natural healer. He has very hot hands. In ancient Hawaii, they would choose children to become Kahuna LomiLomi (Masters of Healing Massage) by how hot their hands were.

At one point during the session, Giovanni had one hand on each of my feet. It felt very grounding and stable. While he had his hands on both my feet, I felt someone caressing my forehead. I had my eyes closed, and a thought occurred to me that someone else might be there looking through my backpack, but it felt so good to have healing hands on my feet and head that I just kept my eyes closed.

After the session (before I could tell Giovanni about my experience), he shared what the session was like for him. He said that he sensed the presence of a mother figure who was saying, “My son, my son” while he was grounding my feet. He also said that she sternly said, “Don’t give up; you know better.”

Giovanni also said that he almost started crying at one point when the iPod that was on shuffle played, “Ave Maria.” He felt the presence of angels surrounding us.

I remember recognizing the song and feeling a deep peace with the moment.

When I told Giovanni about feeling someone at my feet and forehead, he was blown away. He said he wasn’t sure if he should share what he experienced with me, but was glad he did.

What a day!

September 14th

Before boarding the flight back to California, I waited as long as I could to breathe in as much mana (power) from the ‘āina (land) as I could. The change in oxygen levels from Hawaii to the airplane to California were obvious.

sunset san jose

I landed to a gorgeous sunset in San Jose.


Ate a lot of raw vegan food in Hawaii. I also had poi which felt nourishing and healing. For a few dinners, I did eat tofu which tasted great, but I’m not sure how that affects the dis-ease.

I have to say that drinking this alkaline ionized water has been really powerful. I feel so much more hydrated and nourished.


Did my exercises and prayers to the sunrise with some qigong walking at Kailua on 9/13 and some short exercises in the airport on 9/14. Not much exercises on the plane and I just crashed when I got home.


Lots of stress in the home after getting back from Hawaii. Jett and Fox are acting out at school. Beryl is feeling overburdened. Trying to keep the Aloha spirit alive in Cupertino.


The session with Giovanni gave me confidence to pursue my current path. I do feel like I have angels watching over me.

Seeing the Hawaiian man in the grocery store felt very comforting–kind of like another angel.

Kūkae (BM)

Noticeably less bleeding. Still bleeding, but less bloody mess when I wipe. I also had a few BMs where there was no blood or very little blood. I also feel like I don’t have as much obstruction when i have a BM.

Got a few signs around enemas while in Hawaii–including Mandy gifting me 2 enema bags with organic coffee. I am considering doing enemas with 11.5 ph water since cancer cells thrive in acidic environments.

Aloha Cancer 9/11/2015

waxing crescentMauli
Māhoe Mua 11

Woke up this September 11th to a torrential rainstorm. On the 14th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks and the 23rd anniversary of Hurricane Iniki, I asked for permission to enter the Keaiwa Heiau. The rain and a feeling told me not to enter, so I did my prayers outside the heiau.

This day is also the last day of the moon cycle. Tonight the new moon (moku) goes dark and a new waxing cycle begins (hilo).

City of RefugeTomorrow feels like a new light punching through the darkness. It is no coincidence that I am hosting the first Aloha Awakenings Workshop on Hawaiian Lands.


Water seems to be the theme of the day. Not only is it pouring rain, but Crystal put a comment about Masaru Emoto’s water crystal photos. Then my cousin offered to buy me a $2000 water ionizer. “Money is no object, if it will help you live longer,” said my generous and loving favorite cousin.


Listened to my body and rested today. I am aware that I have to facilitate a 7 hour workshop tomorrow, so getting rest is important.


Obviously, I am honored by my cousin’s generous and thoughtful offer. Amazing how different friends and family members are showing love and support in different ways. So grateful.


Was suppose to go to a Hawaiian Bible study today, but it got cancelled due to the weather. Turns out that I needed a nap and some rest. I used to try to jam spirituality in my life. Now I take my time and rest when needed.


After one of the longest BMs this morning that I have had in over a year, I had a lot of blood or beet juice during the day. Lots of blood sediment. Not sure what is going on, but I’m just trying to be patient and aware.

Aloha Cancer 9/10/2015

waxing crescentMauli
Māhoe Mua 10

Remembered what Uncle Paul Strauch told me and asked to enter the heiau this morning. The Gods answered with this anuenue (rainbow). So grateful for the blessings.

rainbow heieauSpent the rest of the day with my dear friend, Mandy, posting up flyers for the workshop. Mandy is pure joy. Even when we got detoured by traffic, she smiled and said, “Let’s go check out the surf at Makapu`u.” One healer told me that Love and Joy will heal cancer faster and more effective than any other treatment. Time with Mandy is full of love and joy.

We anonymously paid for juice and shave ice for those who came after us, leaving a smile card. We handed out flowers to strangers in parking lots. We laughed at how amazing life can be when you let go of the reins. The only problem with hanging out with Mandy is that she insists on paying for everything.


Had both lunch and dinner at Peace Cafe. Wonderful vegan food in a small space with tranquil decor.


Just morning exercises and prayers. Ran around a lot passing out flyers. Did an oli (Hawaiian chanting) class with Malia and gave a small workshop for my friend Darren and his pregnant wife Chiaki.


So honored to spend time with Darren, his wife, and his mother, Reggie. Even though Darren and I don’t see each other often, we still have a deep love for each other that has spanned three decades. At one point, Darren said with tears in his eyes, “I understand your choice and respect your spirit, but I don’t want to have to say goodbye to you.”


One of my friends has heart problems. The doctor wanted to do open heart surgery. After a few months, they checked her heart again and it had gotten better, so now they are holding off on the surgery. I want her to attend my workshop, so we can open the heart without scalpels. Just knowing that the body can reverse dis-ease all on its own is an inspiration and example for me. I am grateful for her authentic and vulnerable share.


Lots of blood today. I was a bit perplexed, until I remembered that yesterday I drank a juice that had beets in it and ate oatmeal with grated raw beets. Maybe this isn’t blood, but beet coloring. I felt good all day, so not too concerned. Mandy told me all about coffee enemas, so I might start doing those when I get home.

Aloha Cancer 9/8/2015

waxing crescentKāloa Pau
Māhoe Mua 8

This morning I got dropped off at San Jose Airport at 6 AM for a 9 AM flight to Honolulu, so i decided to do my morning prayers and exercises in the waiting lounge. I picked an empty area no where near my gate and started my prayers.

As I started the movements, I notices someone approaching me out of the corner of my eye, but I ignored them, trying to focus. Finally, I had to look up at this large man who was smiling at me. It turned out to be a high school friend who happened to be flying out to Florida with his family.

He had heard about my diagnosis, so he asked how things were going. When I said that I was just doing alternative therapies, his wife chimed in and said I should talk to their neighbor. Turns out that they live next to a well-known naturopath who specializes in medicinal marijuana.

The funny thing is that when I had told my Hawaiian healing teacher about my diagnosis, she also suggested medical marijuana. Looks like I might be getting high soon. haha. Actually, the marijuana that they prescribe doesn’t get one high.

When I landed in Hawaii, I breathed in the moist air and felt nourished. I thought about how just being on this island was healing, until I took a lungful of jet fuel odor. I’ll bet that being in natural Hawaii is extremely healing. Unfortunately, it is getting harder and harder to find pristine Hawaiian lands nowadays.


Had to turn down everything on the plane. Amazing how anti-anti-cancer the meals they serve on the plane are–tons of sugar, no vegetables, lots of protein rich foods. Luckily, when I landed, my auntie took me to a health food store where I found some organic salads, including a taro vegan potato salad. Yum.


Just my morning prayers and exercise. A little qigong walking to the terminal gate.


Talked with a number of friends and relatives in Hawaii and felt a tremendous amount of Aloha and peace. Got a sweet phone message from Beryl and the boys.


Talked with my Uncle’s niece who teaches Hawaiian Language at Punahou Schools (the school Obama went to). We talked about spirituality, Christianity, and Hawaiian healing. She invited me to a Hawaiian bible study on Friday. So excited to partake in this powerful experience of reading the Bible in Hawaiian.


Bleeding seems to be tapering off. Had some large BMs today, relatively speaking. It “feels” like the tumor is smaller since I don’t have that uncomfortable feeling when I have a BM. Alison said something that really resonated with me: “Maybe it would be possible to reframe other small indicators of the illness in a different more positive way so they are not about illness but simply about the body’s needs in the moment.” I realized that there are larger processes going on in my body and spirit that need time and space. I can’t judge every drop of blood as an indicator of my health and recovery. Thanks, Alison.

Healing Cancer With Aloha

hawaiian sunset

How ancient Hawaiian wisdom can help heal a modern epidemic.

“No, No, No, you can’t refuse treatment; you have cancer,” the doctor was shaking his forefinger at me.

“I understand, but chemo, radiation, and surgery don’t feel right to me,” I explained.

The doctor shook his head and turned his palms toward the ceiling.

What this doctor didn’t understand is that I have always believed that there are many paths to healing. Refusing conventional Western medicine is not a death sentence in my eyes. In fact, it is one of the most healing things I can do for my body and my family.

I see this dis-ease as a message from my ancestors that I have some cleaning to do. What follows is my five prong approach to healing cancer with Hawaiian spirituality.

1. Wai

Wai means water in Hawaiian. Wai is sacred in Hawaii. Traveling thousands of miles across the Pacific ocean, Hawaiians knew that without water, survival was bleak. One of my friends told me about a colon cleanse that a Kahuna named Auntie Margret Machado used to host. The one thing my friend remembers is that “they had to drink choke (lots of) sea water.”

One theory about cancer claims that cancer grows due to dehydration, so I’m trying to flood my body with wai. I try to drink at least a gallon of spring water everyday. I also juice as much as possible, turning my meals into liquid.

2. Hâ

Hâ in Hawaiian means breath or more specifically “the breath of life.” Aloha means to be in the presence of “the breath of life” or the Divine. Using Aloha to heal from dis-ease involves breathing deeply into the Divine. I do a number of deep breathing practices from meditation to swimming.

Research shows that cancer is anaerobic and can’t survive in oxygen rich environments. Oxygenating one’s blood with deep breathing helps the body fight the cancer.

My friend’s father, who was an MD, was diagnosed with terminal cancer in the 1970s. Rather than do chemo and radiation, he chose to strap on a scuba tank and dive 20 feet under water off the coast of Hawaii. He would sit under the water for 20 minutes breathing the oxygen rich mixture. His cancer went into remission much to the amazement of the doctors at the time.

Unfortunately, I’m not a certified scuba diver, so I’m taking a supplement called Apex that uses nano-silver particles to oxygenate the blood.

3. Ho`oponopono

Most people who’ve heard of ho`oponopono are familiar with “Self-I-dentity” ho`oponopono popularized by Joe Vitale. Although I continue to clear my subconscious by repeating “I love you; thank you; thank you” over and over, I’m using a more traditional form of ho`oponopono to heal this dis-ease in my body.

In Hawaiian healing, they don’t just ask where it hurts and what you ate; they ask who you were with and what you said. In ancient times, a family would sit down and ho`oponopono a ma`i (sickness). facilitated by a kahuna (medicine man) or kupuna (elder). Unfortunately, there are not too many kahuna around, so I’m gathering my family members to have a healing session to clear any negative energy that might be lingering between us.

One of the greatest gifts of this diagnosis is that my family, who would never agree to sitting in a circle to talk about emotions, have consented to participate if it will help heal the tumor in my guts.

4. `Olu`Olu

I’ve always taken my body for granted. Actually, I’ve been pretty abusive to my body. When I used to surf, I would pull into waves that I knew I had no chance of making. It stroked my ego, but it thrashed my skin, limbs, and bones.

Even as a meditator, I would force myself to sit through excruciating pain in order to maintain the semblance of equanimity. This disease has made me realize that my body is my temple, so I’m taking care of it like it is a child. In Hawaiian, the term `olu`olu means to be gentle. If I am to heal this dis-ease, I need to be gentle with my na`au (guts) where the tumor is. I’ve cut all sugar, meat, bread, alcohol, and dairy from my diet. I nurture my intestines with fresh fruits and vegetables, freshly squeezed juices, and lots of water.

I also spend time each day rubbing my belly and telling it that I love it. My approach to the tumor is to kill it with kindness, not to poison it or cut it out. I feel that if I can heal in this manner, then I am getting to the source of the dis-ease and not just curing the symptoms.


During meditation, I realized that my body is simply reflecting the state of the `âina (land). If you think about it, our planet has colorectal cancer–there is too much unprocessed waste that is poisoning the whole. A Chinese medicine doctor told me that this condition I’ve been diagnosed with comes from too much heat in the body. The earth also has too much heat that we call global warming.

The Hawaii state motto is “Ua mau ke ea o ka `aina i ka pono,” which translates to “the life of the land is perpetuated in righteousness.” I see this dis-ease as a challenge for me to be pono (righteous) in order to save the land and my body.

Pono doesn’t really have the religious connotations of righteousness. I translate pono as being in alignment with the Divine. Lately, I’ve been actively trying to get in line with nature. I walk barefoot on the ‘âina, hug trees, swim in the ocean, and try to get as much sunshine without wearing sunscreen as possible.

I don’t know what all these practices will do to the tumor inside of me, but I do know that they have already brought me in alignment with my ancestors, my family, my friends, my sons, and the Divine. In a way, this diagnosis has been the greatest gift I have ever received.

Photo: talbot

Weekly Photo Challenge: Foreign–“Tako” Bell Then and Now

Grandpa and Tako

“We shall not cease from exploration
And the end of all our exploring
Will be to arrive where we started
And know the place for the first time.”
T.S. Eliot

When I was a kid, my Hawaiian grandfather used to take me octopus fishing. After we cleaned our catch, my grandfather would always force me to eat a piece of octopus. Being a good suburban boy, I retched at the thought of eating a slice of slimy steamed octopus tentacle with the suckers hanging off. Having watched my grandfather routinely rip the back off living crabs and suck the meat out while the crab’s legs clawed at the empty air had already given me reason to distrust my grandfather’s palate.
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